Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Mr.L's Letter To RNC Chairman Reince Priebus


Chairman Reince Priebus
Republican National Committee
310 First Street
SE Washington DC 20003

Dear Chairman Priebus,
As a lifelong conservative Republican living in New York, I am disillusioned with the Republican Party.  Once again, it seems the party is not listening to the conservative base.  It is evident that the GOP will nominate another moderate, Gov. Mitt Romney, resulting in losing to Pres. Barack Obama and the Democrats in November of 2012. 
I am what you would call one of these voters who make up roughly 5-10% of the electorate.  We’re engaged, well versed on the issues, candidates, and follow the process very closely.  We do not show up to the voting booth in November to play eenie meenie miney.
On February 24th, The Hill published an article by Cameron Joseph reporting that the  RNC—the chairs, committeemen, donors—are considering changing the primary rules yet again to avoid a possible brokered convention scenario in Florida this summer. 

Let me get this straight;  the RNC first changed rules last year in order to prolong the system so lesser known, more conservative, non-establishment candidates would have more of a chance in the primaries.  Really, that was nice of you.  Except for the fact that Gov. Romney insists on running a scorched Earth campaign.  He continues to pour record amounts of money into unscrupulous attacks against anyone in the field who poses a threat to his front runner status. 
And now, since you fear a possible delegate deadlock and looming talk of brokered convention, the RNC seeks to change the rules back so that you can make it easier for Gov. Romney to wrap up the nomination before the Spring.  Insanity.  Sen. John McCain benefited from these rules in 2008.  He wrapped up the nomination in March of that year and what happened?  Republican voters soured on Sen. McCain and it’s likely the same will happen to Gov. Romney should he get the nomination. 
Contrary to the popular belief of the GOP establishment, Gov. Romney is not the most electable.  If he was, he wouldn’t have lost three states to Sen. Santorum.  He wouldn’t have lost Iowa, a state where he sank millions of campaign and advertising dollars over the years.  Same goes for the Michigan primaries, where Gov. Romney almost lost in his home state. 
I realize that the battle cry of those in the GOP chain of command—the committeemen, chairmen, donors—who say that we should all get the nomination process done ASAP so we can begin pulling the party together and raise money.  That’s nice, but that’s the way it has been done for decades.  How has that approach worked out?
In 1976, the strategy preferred by the establishment shunned Ronald Reagan, producing Gerald Ford.  Ford lost to Carter.  In 1996, this strategy produced Bob Dole.  Dole lost to Clinton.  In 2000, this strategy produced George W. Bush.  If not for fierce legal defense, Al Gore would’ve been president.  In 2008, this strategy produced John McCain.   If it had not been for the vice presidential nomination of Gov. Sarah Palin, McCain would’ve suffered a loss not seen since the campaign of Sen. Barry Goldwater in 1964.
Mr. Chairman, the old rules, strategies and conventional wisdom is not working.  If the Republican Party wants to win against Pres. Obama this fall— and I’m uncertain the party really is interested in winning—something drastic and unconventional has to be done.  Not only to save the country, but to save the party as well. 
You are aware that chatter of a brokered convention is reaching a fever pitch.  In several polls, an overwhelming number of voters seek a late entrant who is not currently running to jump in because they see a lack of excitement surrounding all of the candidates in the field.
Gov. Sarah Palin is the only one for the job.  Admit it.  The GOP were less than a welcoming committee when she was thinking about running for POTUS.  Yes, she announced she wouldn’t run at this time.  So did Gov. Christie, Gov. Daniels and Rep. Ryan.  All of them have refused.  Yet, their names are floated as late entrants by establishment figures.  Gov. Palin is the only one who hasn’t shunned the idea of a brokered convention and has not ruled out offering herself up in the name of service if such a scenario should play out. 
Many in the Republican Party continue to marginalize her. Many of you call her a “quitter” because she resigned as Governor.  That would hurt her chances, you say.   Three governors were in the 2012 field, one still in office and two who completed full terms.  How did it work for them?  Two of them dropped out of the race because they couldn’t consistently poll out of the single digits.  The other is the current frontrunner who can’t consistently poll over 30% nationally.
Many in the Republican Party establishment believe Sarah Palin is irrelevant.  Let me remind you of the 2010 elections.  Palin led conservatives in the fight against Obama, Reid and Pelosi’s destructive policies.  Palin had 67% success rate in getting republicans that she endorsed elected into office.  
Tell me, what other Republican can claim such an accomplishment?
Sarah Palin is a politician willing to govern on constitutional conservative principles.  She has been thoroughly vetted through the years. She has the correct supply side and pro-growth economic policies that this country so desperately needs.  She understands the importance of energy self-reliance through drilling for oil and gas.  She can easily excite the base, one that suffers from an acute case of campaign fatigue.  She has the ability to unite social, fiscal, tea party conservatives, evangelicals—many who feel they have to hold their noses and vote for moderate in every election.  There are millions of her supporters who are willing to walk over broken glass for her. 
In closing, the RNC should avoid changing the rules and allow the primary process to play out. Sarah Palin should be the only republican politician considered as a candidate in a brokered convention.   The rest are unacceptable.  
Best wishes,

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